EASTER SALE: Kids cars and more!

We have been invaded by the spirit of Easter!
We have found a basket full of Easter eggs and huge discounts for all of you and we are happy! When? Where? Read on:

You'll see, from THURSDAY 14th to MONDAY 18th of April, we will turn our website upside down with discounts of UP TO 50% OFF! The Easter season could not come in any other way than bringing you your favorite products at the best price, KIDS CARS by the best brands in the market and more!

Now that we have informed you about the BOMB of discounts, do you want to know a little more about Easter? We'll tell you all about it:


Easter is a festival of overwhelming joy. The joy that celebrates life. Or, rather, the victory of life over death and is celebrated on different dates every year, as it falls on the first Sunday after the full moon following the spring equinox.

It is deeply connected to the changing of seasons, as after the Spring equinox, we officially advance to Spring and summer, with Longer days of sunlight each day, a reason for merriment. It signifies growth, new life, abundance and happier days. One of the major reasons why eggs represent Easter celebrations.

But what are the roots of Easter in the US?

Well, while in countries such as Spain or Latin America, representations of the Passion of Jesus Christ are paraded through the streets, the tradition in our country is a little different.

Easter did not enjoy the status of a popular festival among the early settlers in America. Because most of them were Puritans or members of Protestant Churches who had little use for the ceremonies of any religious festivals. Even the Puritans in Massachusetts tried their best to play down the celebration of Easter as far as possible. While various rites are said to be associated with the celebration of Easter, most of them have come as part of the ancient spring rites in the Northern hemisphere.

Not until the period of the Civil War did the message and meaning of Easter begin to be expressed as it had been in Europe. It was the initiative of the Presbyterians. The scars of death and destruction which led people back to the Easter season. They found the story of resurrection as a great source of inspiration and renewed hope. Since then, of course, its joyous customs delight children and adults alike.

But, why do we hunt for Easter Eggs?

Early Christian missionaries hid Easter eggs painted with biblical scenes for children to find. The children would find the Easter eggs and tell the story associated with the paintings. Therefore, early Easter egg hunts helped children learn about the significance of Easter.

One of the earliest Easter egg hunts that most resembles the modern Easter egg hunt can be traced to Martin Luther. Martin Luther was a key leader in the Protestant Reformation. During this time, men would hide eggs for women and children to find. The joy the women and children experienced as they found eggs mirrored the joy the women felt when they found Jesus’ tomb empty and realized He had risen.

Just like early Easter egg hunts, we hide eggs for children to find. For our modern Easter egg hunts, we hide special goodies inside each egg. Therefore, when children open the Easter eggs to find their surprise inside, they experience happiness and joy—the same happiness and joy Jesus’ followers experienced when they heard the Good News of His resurrection.

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